Worship with Holy Cross Lutheran

Join us for live participatory worship in-person and/or via Zoom, including the celebration of Holy Communion, this Sunday, October 17th at 9:30 am Mountain Time

Bible Theme for the Day
Today’s gospel starts with disciples obsessing over who will be closest to Jesus, leading to Jesus teaching his followers about God’s take on importance and power. Here Jesus makes it explicit that the reversal of values in God’s community is a direct challenge to the values of the dominant culture, where wielding power over others is what makes you great. When we pray “your kingdom come” we are praying for an end to tyranny and oppression. We pray this gathered around the cross, a sign of great shame transformed to be the sign of great honor and service.

We will pray with one another, have children's time, read from the Bible, hear good news proclaimed during the sermon, confess our faith, share the Lord's Supper, bless one another, and send each other, refreshed by God's presence, to live God's mission in our world. Following worship we will have community time and check in with one another.

Immediately following worship, for about 10 to 15 minutes, we will have our final brief conversation as we revisit the Holy Cross mission statement.

Using the “SVOR" model (Strengths, Vulnerabilities, Opportunities, Risks), we will engage conversation around Holy Cross's risks for mission as the body of Christ.

Risks:
–What are the inherent risks Holy Cross takes as we continue to try new ways of doing things in our journey of redevelopment?
–What are the inherent risks of not trying new ways of doing things in our journey of redevelopment?
–What is your personal risk tolerance for our shared ministry? What do you think Holy Cross's risk tolerance should be?

I hope to see you there!

Join Worship via Zoom
Time:
October 17, 2021 at 9:30 AM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

Meeting ID: 8523 735 5384

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Readings for Sunday Worship

Mark 10:32-45

On the way to Jerusalem the disciples ask Jesus to grant them seats of honor. Jesus responds by announcing that he and his followers will “rule” through self-giving service.

They were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them; they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. He took the twelve aside again and began to tell them what was to happen to him, saying, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death; then they will hand him over to the Gentiles; they will mock him, and spit upon him, and flog him, and kill him; and after three days he will rise again.”

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”
When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

Isaiah 53:4-12

This reading is from the last of four passages in Isaiah that are often called “servant songs.” Christians are probably most familiar with this servant song. In light of Christian faith, the servant’s healing ministry and redemptive suffering are understood to be fulfilled in the life and death of Christ.

 Surely he has borne our infirmities
  and carried our diseases;
 yet we accounted him stricken,
  struck down by God, and afflicted.
 But he was wounded for our transgressions,
  crushed for our iniquities;
 upon him was the punishment that made us whole,
  and by his bruises we are healed.
 All we like sheep have gone astray;
  we have all turned to our own way,
 and the Lord has laid on him
  the iniquity of us all.

 He was oppressed, and he was afflicted,
  yet he did not open his mouth;
 like a lamb that is led to the slaughter,
  and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent,
  so he did not open his mouth.
 By a perversion of justice he was taken away.
  Who could have imagined his future?
 For he was cut off from the land of the living,
  stricken for the transgression of my people.
 They made his grave with the wicked
  and his tomb with the rich,
 although he had done no violence,
  and there was no deceit in his mouth.

 Yet it was the will of the Lord to crush him with pain.
 When you make his life an offering for sin,
  he shall see his offspring, and shall prolong his days;
 through him the will of the Lord shall prosper.
  Out of his anguish he shall see light;
 he shall find satisfaction through his knowledge.
  The righteous one, my servant, shall make many righteous,
  and he shall bear their iniquities.
 Therefore I will allot him a portion with the great,
  and he shall divide the spoil with the strong;
 because he poured out himself to death,
  and was numbered with the transgressors;
 yet he bore the sin of many,
  and made intercession for the transgressors.

Information for First Time Attendees

You can connect using your computer, smart phone or tablet device.

On your computer, when asked “do you want to run Zoom" click yes to continue. If you don't have a microphone or camera to use with your computer, you can participate by typing comments in the “chat" feature.

If you prefer to use a mobile device, go to your App Store (Android or Apple) and download the Zoom App. Open the app and follow the prompts.

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There are video and audio controls in the lower left corner of the Zoom application that you can control.

You may use toll free (from most mobile phones) numbers 1-669-900-9128 or 1-253-215-8782 and enter the meeting number.

From most mobile devices you can also click on the “One Tap Mobile" links.